Mr gloom and doom

Everything else.

Moderator: GreenCrayon

Post Reply
User avatar
HARDKORE
The Heavy
Posts: 579
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 8:32 pm
Location: The mirror world

Mr gloom and doom

Post by HARDKORE »

http://www.customtf.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1188

thats from the quake forums. whats wrong. its like all this guy wants to do is talk about the universe going bye bye. i am going to convince this guy that galactis is going to eat us. will someone help me with that.

User avatar
HARDKORE
The Heavy
Posts: 579
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 8:32 pm
Location: The mirror world

Post by HARDKORE »

in all serousness. i like gnarls. i can read about quasars and stuff all day but nothing seem to put me to sleep more then reading about it. Can one of you all help me understand something. If a black hole is in the center of our galexy, why have we not been sucked up long before now?

User avatar
Sahan
"I promise you no penis jokes."
Posts: 4360
Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2008 6:20 am
Location: Perth, Australia
Contact:

Post by Sahan »

Because we are still too far away and moving too fast to be pulled in? Instead the Solar system orbits the black hole, but will get sucked in eventually apparently.
Destructicus wrote: Alt text:
"I wonder if chemists feel bad that they're always left out of these sorts of jokes."

Since when is chemistry not a science?

User avatar
HARDKORE
The Heavy
Posts: 579
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 8:32 pm
Location: The mirror world

Post by HARDKORE »

so in theory, could the sky really fall?

User avatar
Lethal Interjection
Death by Elocution
Posts: 8051
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2005 2:17 pm
Location: Behind your ear. It's magic!
Contact:

Post by Lethal Interjection »

Because it isn't a very big one?
If I recall, the strength of the black hole depends on the size of the collapsed star which preceded it. The larger the gravitational force of the star, the greater the gravitational force of the black hole.
The most interesting thing I read about stars was that they had discovered what they believe to be a white dwarf and a black hole orbiting eachother in some manner. Basically because the light from the star blinked out in consistent way, they worked out that the only currently discovered reason for such would be that a black hole was consistently absorbing the light from the other star, which would only make sense if they were orbiting each other.
Which is a pretty frigging cool idea. The idea of two stars orbiting eachother is pretty cool.
Especially if you think that these stars (or rather two regular stars, with no black hole) could each have a planet orbiting around them. Especially if they were in identical orbits, both in distance from the sun, and in identical places in respect to their suns. Then if both had life on them, but it wasn't until significant steps in space travel have been made would they even know that the other planet existed. Obviously it is a large stretch to make, but the simple possibility I find interesting.

User avatar
HARDKORE
The Heavy
Posts: 579
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 8:32 pm
Location: The mirror world

Post by HARDKORE »

another thing i found interesting, he told me where to find mars in a telescope. Whats a good kind to get. i looked at wal mart and they had like 20 brands.

User avatar
mountainmage
Mage of the Mountains
Posts: 9601
Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 11:42 am
Location: Right here. Right now.

Post by mountainmage »

If you want to buy a quality anything, don't get it from wal-mart. Try looking for an online telescope/astronomy paraphernalia store.
No more white horses ♬ ♫ ♪ ılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılı ♪ ♫ ♬ for you to ride away

User avatar
Lethal Interjection
Death by Elocution
Posts: 8051
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2005 2:17 pm
Location: Behind your ear. It's magic!
Contact:

Post by Lethal Interjection »

Agreed. Something like that should be purchased from someone who isn't a major retailer. Particularly a major retailer like Walmart.
With something like a telescope, you are probably going to need some customer service (especially since you don't have much knowledege on the subject), which you won't get. And you do need it to be of some quality, which is possible, but a bit of a gamble. Basically, if it is something you want, and want to have for quite a while, Walmart ain't the place. And I work there.
Basically, I bought a Phillips DVD player from my Walmart, but I wanted a cheap one, and I do want to eventually upgrade to a really nice media centre. So I bought one from Walmart. And I wouldn't have, if it wasn't for my discount, and that was the tipping factor, even though all I wanted was something cheap that would last a few years.

User avatar
HARDKORE
The Heavy
Posts: 579
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 8:32 pm
Location: The mirror world

Post by HARDKORE »

This one is in my price range. I really dont need anything fancy. I have an old science teacher who said he would help me learn to use one.

User avatar
TwoBuy
Clinically Casbah Rockin'
Posts: 2172
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2005 8:15 am
Location: Pimpin' (It's a location if you're doing it right)
Contact:

Post by TwoBuy »

So here's the thing with telescopes. Buying a cheap-o telescope (even like the meade you posted) is going to disenfranchise you with astronomy because you won't be able to see anything and will have problems maintaining it, tracking celestial objects, etc.

I recommend for ALL people that the first "telescope" you should get is a nice pair of astronomy binoculars. I cannot recommend this high enough. Once you've started to master the night sky and locating objects, only then would I move to a quality (probably ~$400) REFLECTING telescope (6"-10"). I will warn against refracting telescopes (like that meade one) unless you can shell out the cash for a really nice one (like $800+). For the binoculars, you can use any meaty camera tripod stand (holding them with your hand will be too shaky).

I'd recommend thesefor a first pair. They're affordable and really high quality. You will be able to see planets pretty well, the moon great, and they are wide enough aperture to see some nice nebulas. If you have questions the guys at bigbinoculars.com are super helpful and knowledgeable.
Stories from 19-yo mistresses
Hey girl whats up
A drunk driver hit my blind, 12-yo sister on her way home from school. Im @ the funeral
hahaha
That wasnt a joke dick-hole
Oh
Sooooo... my gf will be out of town Wednesday. U gunna be back by then?

User avatar
Lethal Interjection
Death by Elocution
Posts: 8051
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2005 2:17 pm
Location: Behind your ear. It's magic!
Contact:

Post by Lethal Interjection »

TwoBuy wrote:I recommend for ALL people that the first "telescope" you should get is a nice pair of astronomy binoculars.
Question: Do these astronomy binoculars get past the light pollution of a big city? Not that I am that interested in purchasing any time soon, I'd just love to know for future reference.

User avatar
TwoBuy
Clinically Casbah Rockin'
Posts: 2172
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2005 8:15 am
Location: Pimpin' (It's a location if you're doing it right)
Contact:

Post by TwoBuy »

Lethal Interjection wrote:Question: Do these astronomy binoculars get past the light pollution of a big city? Not that I am that interested in purchasing any time soon, I'd just love to know for future reference.
Well, yes and no. No more so than a telescope. There's two measurements on the binos, diameter of the lens and magnification. A 11x70 means 70mm lens with a magnification of 11x.

Magnification is just how deep they will look. The advantages of a higher number is that you will see distant objects appear to be larger (but not necessarily more detailed). Basically the small distant dot will look like a larger distant dot. Higher magnification is good for things like looking at planets and galaxies. The disadvantage of higher magnification is less field of view, and tracking. Basically you get tunnel vision, which means that it is sometimes hard to get an object into view and you will have to move the binos more frequently as the earth turns. It also means you might not be able to see large objects (like nebulas, Andromeda, the moon, some star clusters) in completion. You'll only see a bit of them at a time.

For lens size bigger is just better. The only drawback of larger lenses is that it's heavier and you'll need a larger mount/tripod. Also the cost grows exponentially with size. The lens size determines how much light is absorbed. Just like how your pupils grow to let more light in when it's dark. This is also the important part for city glow. Nothing is going to cancel out the background light, but the binos/telescope can help a lot by collecting more light. Thus what you see will still be hazy, but you'll get to see the stars behind it too. With the background light, you can still get really nice views of bright objects. Looking at crators on the moon, and Venus, Mars, and Jupiter will all be splendid. Here's a picture of mars from a 70mm telescope. Faint objects like nebulas and galaxies will be hard though with light pollution.
Stories from 19-yo mistresses
Hey girl whats up
A drunk driver hit my blind, 12-yo sister on her way home from school. Im @ the funeral
hahaha
That wasnt a joke dick-hole
Oh
Sooooo... my gf will be out of town Wednesday. U gunna be back by then?

User avatar
Jiggz
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2007 10:24 am
Location: Crawling out of my own asshole

Post by Jiggz »

As for your interest in black holes, Hardkore, I suggest Hawking's Black Holes and Baby Universes. It's pretty accessible, yet just technical enough to make you feel like you're grasping complicated physics. And Mr. Hawking is surprisingly funny.

User avatar
HARDKORE
The Heavy
Posts: 579
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 8:32 pm
Location: The mirror world

Post by HARDKORE »

Someone tell me a good page to find out about constellations. one with pictures so i know what im looking for.

I went with a cheap 25 buck wal mart barnd. nothing fancy but it lets me look out there. who knows, i might find the truth.

Post Reply