[2014-01-02]

Blame Quintushalls for this.

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saskiiaa
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Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:25 pm

[2014-01-02]

Post by saskiiaa »

GOD YES. My whole career summed up in one comic.

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Sahan
"I promise you no penis jokes."
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Re: [2014-01-02]

Post by Sahan »

You have experienced a fairly succinct career.
Destructicus wrote: Alt text:
"I wonder if chemists feel bad that they're always left out of these sorts of jokes."

Since when is chemistry not a science?

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Kimra
He-Man in a Miniskirt
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Re: [2014-01-02]

Post by Kimra »

The absence of a comic would be a fitting summary of my career.
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Re: [2014-01-02]

Post by DisgruntledPHd »

I thought this comic was inspired by real life events:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodore_Streleski

"Theodore Landon "Ted" Streleski (born 1936) is an American former graduate student in mathematics at Stanford University who murdered his former faculty advisor, Professor Karel de Leeuw, with a small sledge hammer on August 18, 1978. Shortly after the murder, Streleski turned himself in to the authorities, claiming he felt the murder was justifiable homicide because de Leeuw had withheld departmental awards from him, demeaned Streleski in front of his peers, and refused his requests for financial support. Streleski was in his 16th year pursuing his doctorate in the mathematics department, alternating with low-paying jobs to support himself.[1]
During his trial Streleski told the court he felt the murder was "logically and morally correct" and "a political statement" about the department's treatment of its graduate students, and he forced his court-appointed lawyer to enter a plea of "not guilty" rather than "not guilty by reason of insanity" as the lawyer had urged.[1] Streleski was convicted of second degree murder and he served seven years in prison for his actions.
Streleski was eligible for parole on three occasions, but turned it down as the conditions of his parole required him to not set foot on the Stanford campus. Upon his release in 1985, he said, "I have no intention of killing again. On the other hand, I cannot predict the future."[2]"

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